Sunday, 25 August 2013

Etoh Abuse patients

Etoh Abuse patients

Etoh abuse is a term used for alcohol addicted patients. The proper care and treatment can help those patients to fully recover from the illness. For more information, please be in touch with our upcoming posts. Thank you for reading.

Thursday, 6 June 2013

What does etoh abuse means

What does etoh abuse means:

ETOH stands for ethanol. It is a common term used in medical histories to designate alcoholic beverages. When combined in the term "etoh abuse", it usually refers to a patient's history of over consumption of alcoholic beverages such as beer or hard liquor. It refers to abuse of drinking alcohol. The term "alcohol abuse" is used in everyday language to describe misuse of or dependence on alcohol. However, it is important to understand the difference in the meaning of alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse, both of which are substance use disorders related to what is popularly considered as alcoholism.

Difference between Abuse and Dependence:

According to the DSM-IV-R, alcohol abuse is misuse of alcohol that results in clinically significant impairment or distress and is manifested in at least one of the following ways during a 12-month period: an individual is unable to fulfill his work, school, or home obligations because of alcohol use, alcohol is used in physically dangerous situations, such as while driving, an individual experiences multiple legal problems as a result of his alcohol use; and an individual continues to consume alcohol despite negative effects on his social or interpersonal dealings. Alcohol dependence differs from abuse in that the individual now exhibits signs and symptoms of physical and/or psychological dependence on alcohol, such as increasing tolerance or withdrawal symptoms.

Simptoms of Etoh Abuse:

If an individual exhibits any of the manifestations of alcohol abuse, this may be a sign that they have a problem with alcohol that is growing out of control. Additionally, an individual who abuses alcohol may not be able to control the amount that he drinks, may experience blackouts during drinking spells, or may become irritable or depressed when alcohol is not available. Other behaviors of concern include surreptitious drinking; binge drinking; hiding alcohol in unusual places around the home, at work or in the car; and frequent unexplained injuries. Those who have become alcohol dependent generally require outside help to stop drinking, which could include detoxification, medical treatment, professional rehab or counseling and/or self-help group support.